Global carbon emissions rise as a result of coal revival

BY LEAH WILLIAMS
Posted on JUL 29, 2019

Global carbon dioxide emissions from energy use increased 1.6 percent in 2017 following three years of stagnation.

In circumventing the critical impacts of climate change, Wednesday's published BP Statistical Review of World Energy analysis of global carbon dioxide emissions further indicates worldwide failure to reach the initiatives imposed by the Paris agreement.

Spencer Dale, the BP's chief economist, told the Guardian that the globe's emissions rise was "slightly worrying" and a "pretty big backward step."
"It suggests to me we are not on a path to the Paris climate goals," he added.

The report highlighted how the world's fuel mix has "strikingly" not changed in the last 20 years.

"I am more worried by the lack of progress in the power sector over the past 20 years than by the pickup in carbon emissions last year," Dale noted to the Guardian.

The report unveiled how the increase in greenhouse gas emissions was driven by a 2.2 percent increase in global energy demand last year, as well as increased coal consumption for the first time in four years, led by growing demand in India and China.

"Together, China and India accounted for nearly half of the increase in global carbon emissions," a press release for the study stated. "EU emissions were also up (1.5 percent) with just Spain accounting for 44 percent of the increase in EU emissions."

In contrast, emissions declines were led by the United State (-0.5 percent)the third year in a row that the nation's emissions declined, although the fall was the smallest over those three years. The UK and Denmark reported the lowest carbon emissions in their history